GPS Dealing with Back Spasms

Last Saturday morning I had just finished cleaning up breakfast at the campsite with my kids (Dad’s Camping!), I was on my second cup of coffee sitting at the picnic bench and my back started to seize up. A few minutes later I was telling my brother that I couldn’t get off the bench. He checked on me for the next 60 minutes or so until I could finally stand unassisted as it slowly started to release. Do me a favor: don’t mention that I turned 40 just 50 days ago.

In the days that followed it look longer than expected to get better. I told a couple people at work and then made a mistake by making a comment about missing a workout with my Monday crew and then I got all kinds of questions. Well meaning, caring people is a wonderful thing – I just don’t do well with the (sympathetic) attention. But that’s not what I’m writing about today. As with injury and disease, what we are talking about is reducing risk. You can be a runner, swimmer, gym nut but still get heart disease. Why? Because working out only decreases your risk of disease (or injury).

I mentioned that I was camping when this happened. I was at an event called Dad’s Camping where I met a bunch of new guys through my brother and his friend who started this weekend gathering. My problem was that our first full day started with me not being able to move off a picnic table until I was able to get to the ground and stretch which made a couple guys ask, “is this your normal Saturday morning routine, Hans?” Ahhh! No! I’m actually in pretty good shape, this isn’t me!! But yes, this is me. I’m just another guy with a lower back injury.

Many of my clients are experiencing significant improvements in their health and fitness. But at any given moment a couple of them are dealing with very real barriers to progressing in their workouts. Set backs can be physical (my back) and they can be mental (“this is too hard, this isn’t worth it”). What’s important is identifying these barriers and working through them until you find a solution and eventually victory.

What barrier is in the way of you accomplishing your goals?

One thought on “GPS Dealing with Back Spasms

  1. Jess

    Current barrier: low back/sciatic pain!! Debilitating!
    Definitely empathy-building for dealing with future patients experiencing the same thing. I imagine you can say the same thing.
    Good luck, stay hydrated, mind your electrolytes, and keep stretching! Hope that back recovers quickly.

    Reply

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